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Thoughts on the Current Crisis, Part III

August 8, 2006

edit: Wednesday, 7:36 pm – Updated the Table of Contents after two months.

kr’s note: I apologize for the delayed update. It’s been more than two weeks since I’ve posted something new, since the last post was basically a cheap advertising ploy rather than a real post. I thought I’d go through xanga-withdrawal, a pathologic state perhaps similar to delirium tremens… yeah, what a geeky analogy, I’m sure you must be thinking… but it’s apt as it represents my life at the current moment. Whereas Dante wrote about the levels of Hell in his “Inferno”, he forgot to mention that the penultimate level is doing a third year medical student rotation in the world of general surgery, a bleak, desolate, god-forsaken land filled with miserable people venting their frustrations on those lower on the food chain. As a medical student, one experiences, with varation, the age-old theme of man vs. the world; the world always wins, but man is too maimed to know it. As for my readers, you’ll be pleased to know that I have many tales to share, ranging from feeling life enter & escape a patient to stupendous descriptions of the joys of draining peri-rectal abscesses.

As for me, I have my shelf exam coming up in 10 days for which I am woefully unprepared. In need of your du’as for that, as well as supplications that I keep my sanity for one more week.

On to the post… part III

The aforementioned verses from Surah al-Baqarah that formed the background of
this discussion essentially take us through the factors behind the rise and fall
of a community, specifically focusing on two main elements: a lack of respect
for Allah and His Revelation and a lack of respect for the Prophet that brought
that Revelation. The interesting thing about this surah, as it is a Madinian
chapter, is that it speaks to the nascent Muslim community of Madinah,
delineating the required steps to develop a sustainable and thriving community.
Foremost amongst these steps is the idea that if the community wants to be
enveloped in God’s Blessing, then they must apply and develop what they have
first before seeking what they don’t have. If one can’t be patient with one
diet, then how will one handle seven diets? In other words, one must understand
that Divine Providence gives to each community what it is capable of handling
within a given space-time, and what is given are building blocks towards greater
means. Hence, what is given to every Muslim community, regardless of history and
location, is this religion to serve as spiritual fuel to power themselves
towards their desired goals.

Our problem is that we are like the
teenager that wants to drive his dad’s Ferrari without a license or knowing how
to drive or like the American Muslim chick that wants to make biryani but fails
miserably at it because she hasn’t learnt anything easier from her mom… but I
digress. The point is that our frustration with current history, politics, and
economics incites us to want to go after bigger goals when we are woefully
unprepared for such tasks. The irony, of course, is that since we’re unprepared, we often fail at such attempts, only worsening the vicious cycle of frustration and impotence. We see the evils of the world that we want to see–the ones that we want to fix, conveniently ignoring ones that are more pressing or difficult to address–and we rush off in a flash of fury, eagerly wanting to solve them. In my opinion, such is the case with the Muslim world’s outlook towards the Israel-Palestine issue. Perhaps no other issue in the past 50 years has been filled with such emotional diatribe that it seems as if salvation itself has now been linked to the issue, offering some explanation as to why it seems that every Muslim–from the liquor store owner to the mullah–is so passionate about this topic.

But passion that is not tempered by objective reasoning and faith is like chewing bubble gum to solve a math problem: it feels and tastes good, but the problem still remains. And thus is our frustration with Israel–we rant and rave about all that Israel has done: making flashy powerpoints and flyers filled with facts; holding rallies; arguing with each other at community dinner parties; and of course, my personal favorite, the Ramadan du’a cursing the Zionists and asking God to kill their children and make their women barren. Amazingly enough, Israel still remains, and is still free to do whatever it wishes, given a carte-blanche by the United States. Why? Because we’re too busy wallowing in our self-pity and self-victimization, content to be angry, that we’ve become incapable of fostering real change in the area. For starters, why is it that we’ve not pressured the leaders of the so-called Muslim countries of the Middle East to exert their influence–primarily through oil–to effect change? We’ve seen what’s happened just recently with fuel shortages leading to increased gas prices; if the Arab oil-producing nations were to refuse to sell any oil until the Palestine issue got resolved, it would get solved much quicker than the George W. Bush Palestine State Plan (you know, the one that was advocated in 2000 so that all Muslims should vote for him but hasn’t even begun…).

Let’s face it: Israel exists. It’s on the map, and Palestine isnt… for the time being. Instead of responding with emotion, perhaps it’s time to consider a somewhat more sterile approach: one of calculated reasoning fueled by a reconnected spirituality. In other words, when one is incapable of doing something, it’s time to step back, reflect, and strengthen one’s self to be in a position to one day throw one’s weight around. The Qur’an speaks of this, “And against them make ready your strength to the utmost power, including steeds of war (another translation: horses ready at the frontier) to strike terror into (the hearts of) the
enemies, of God and your enemies, and others besides, whom you may not know,
but whom God does know.
” It’s a very interesting verse, often cited by those seeking to spur others into immediate action, or by anti-Islam rants, now broadcast daily. But it highlights two key themes about power on the macro-level: the idea that one has to prepare and that this preparation is chiefly for intimidation. For the Muslim, preparation is on all levels: physical, mental, economical, social, and psychological. And this is what the Muslims did, historically at least, and thus were able to exert power and not be bullied by those around them. But most important amongst these is spiritual preparation, the intangible factor that the Muslims of Badr had, passed on to each generation as a sacred birthright. And this is exactly why our history is filled with tales such as `Umar being able to communicate with Sariyah, commander of the Muslim army, warning him of the ambush behind the mountain while he was thousands of miles away; and why Khalid b. Walid recited a simple Prophetic dua and drank poison in front of the Byzantine commander, boldly declaring that his faith in God was the only antidote that he needed.

Which leads us to a stark truth: all of this preparation is mainly for show, i.e., to strike fear into one’s existing and potential opponents that it’s not a wise idea to start messing with us, and that a war averted through a display of might is a grand victory–and hence we have as exhibit A, the Prophet (salallahu `alayhi wa sallam) leading an army through the scorching Arabian desert in the midst of summer to Tabuk, a pre-emptive display of might without actual combat to show the Romans what was up. The other lesson is that sometimes it is perhaps more beneficial to psychologically overpower your enemy before you ever meet him on the battlefield and that a mental victory is something to strive for–achieved through whatever mental weapons one has at hand, evident in the Prophetic hadith, “War is deceit”, and his allowal for subterfuge and lies during times of battle. Only when these spheres of preparation are combined–simply put, knowing one’s self through spiritual exertion and knowing one’s enemy through physical effort–can one hope for any meaningful victory. As Sun Tzu writes in The Art of War:

Thus we may know that there are five essentials
for victory:
(1) He will win who knows when to fight and when
not to fight.
(2) He will win who knows how to handle both superior
and inferior forces.
(3) He will win whose army is animated by the same
spirit throughout all its ranks.
(4) He will win who, prepared himself, waits to take
the enemy unprepared.
(5) He will win who has military capacity and is
not interfered with by the sovereign.

Hence the saying: If you know the enemy
and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a
hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy,
for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat.
If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will
succumb in every battle.


Thus, ours is a tradition wherein we are loathe to fight and seek to avert combat, but when it does come time to fight, that we go in prepared with the battle already won mentally beforehand. I’ll be blunt: I hate the existence of a terrorist state like Israel like I hate waking up at 3:45 am every morning, and this latest terrorist attack against a sovereign nation only increases my sentiments. However, what I advocate for is just as the early Muslim communities during their times of powerlessness bided their time and prepared–especially spiritually–to exert political and military might, perhaps the same remedy is in order for the Muslim world today. In other words, we’re so woefully unprepared, evident by the rampant societal and spiritual problems manifest in our communities and Muslim nations, that any attempt to do something significant has been and will continue to be in vain. Like the medical student that gets scutted out and crapped on by his superiors and is relegated to keep his head low and avoid getting yelled at, realizing that any confrontation will only earn him more scut, misery, and won’t accomplish anything… thus he is content to learn whatever he can and slowly rise to a position of power (wherein he can either perpetuate the malignancy, or as a friend of mine advocates, stolen from a recent movie, he can “pay it forward”) to effect his influence in the future, the Muslim nation must accept that this is a time of preparation and patience, and that there is power even in such times for oftentimes the process is more important than the end result.

In other words, there can be no Madinah if there is no Makkah, and the fact that the Companions went through the Makkan phase made them the giants they would become. If we’re desirous of imitating their endeavors and success, then we must be prepared to walk in their footsteps and endure the same regimen they went through–our advantage is that we have history as a guiding light and God as our Keeper, whereas they only had the latter. And thus getting back to the question of Israel, I offer that Muslims must accept that Israel exists and move on. We must let go of our emotional fury and instead channel that towards viable solutions that seek to better ourselves and our brethren such that we are in a position of power once again. And just as the medical student endures his ordeal in the present looking towards sunny days in the future, it’s time for the nation of the Prophet (salallahu `alayhi wa sallam) to endure present defeats and begin girding themselves for future victories. In other words, if we want to restore the Palestinians to their homeland and end Zionist occupation, it’s time to stop crying and start working. Muslims must attain enough status to exert pressure on a global scale to accomplish their objectives, and this requires prayer to serve as the backbone for education, communal amelioration, technological research, studies in the humanities, and military development–the last one has always been crucial to exert power through history. Thus, if it comes to a time when one must fight, one should be prepared to do more than kick his opponent in the shin–one must, and pardon the colloquialism, be prepared to kick ass and take names later. Until that time comes, one must, in the slightly altered words of Bernie Mac, quit our crying and go do some pushups and as Malcolm X (rahimahullah) said, “Be peaceful, be courteous, obey the law, respect everyone; but if someone puts his hand on you, send him to the cemetery.”

To conclude this part, I oppose Zionism and terrorist states  (as do all orthodox Jews, evident in their own scripture) and not Judaism, and that I have no problems with Jews living in and around the Holy Land, for this is what Jews, Christians, and Muslims did for generations until World War II. What I oppose–and I think any person of conscience should oppose–is injustice anywhere, whether the perpetrators be our own brethren or states that have the Star of David on their flag. We know what we must do. The road ahead is fraught with many perils, but if offers the only remedy for the illness that plagues the Ummah and all of creation.

Part IV (conclusion) to follow… hopefully sooner than two weeks =).

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35 Comments
  1. Dear Jesus Phallus,May Allah(SWT) deprive you of his mercyameen

  2. I say we all ignore him and not give his xanga any of the attention he so desperately wants. And such don’t click onto his xanga.

  3. i liiiiike it

  4. Anonymous permalink

    Good luck on your exam, may Allah make everything easy for you

  5. I’ll be blunt: I hate the existence of a terrorist state like Israel like I hate waking up at 3:45 am every morning, and this latest terrorist attack against a sovereign nation only increases my sentimentsI love this line. Do you mind if I quote you sometimes?And I am very comforted by the analogy of Medina/Mecca. Great historical reference.Looking forward to the conclusion..And Ameen to the duas about your exam brother.

  6. Finally, after two weeks you updated… well worth the wait
    Good to see you’re in classic form, combining Qur’an, Hadith, MAlcolm X, Sun Tzu, Bernie Mac and the med student whinings–I mean, analogies, lol.
    I especially liked this line:
    “But passion that is not tempered by objective reasoning and faith is like chewing bubble gum to solve a math problem: it feels and tastes good, but the problem still remains. And thus is our frustration with Israel–we rant and rave about all that Israel has done: making flashy powerpoints and flyers filled with facts; holding rallies; arguing with each other at community dinner parties; and of course, my personal favorite, the Ramadan du’a cursing the Zionists and asking God to kill their children and make their women barren. Amazingly enough, Israel still remains, and is still free to do whatever it wishes, given a carte-blanche by the United States.”

  7. w’salaam.I just skimmed it for now, but it was a good post. much more palatable than the last two.iA you’ll do well on your shelf exam, make dua for my CVS exam on Tuesday.

  8. rofl: “Whereas Dante wrote about the levels of Hell in his “Inferno”, he forgot to mention that the penultimate level is doing a third year medical student rotation in the world of general surgery, a bleak, desolate, god-forsaken land filled with miserable people venting their frustrations on those lower on the food chain. As a medical student, one experiences, with varation, the age-old theme of man vs. the world; the world always wins, but man is too maimed to know it.”

  9. Anonymous permalink

    drop a line or two about how it’s the “in” thing to be all pro-lebanon or anti-israel .. and how that’s shamefully common while many of the same people didn’t even know where beirut was about a month ago

  10. Kareem, how is it relevent to know where Beirut is in coming to the decision of being anti-Israel and pro-Lebanon? Israel indiscriminately massacring people in an area known as Lebanon should be enough of a reason. And what do you mean when you say “shamefully common”?

  11. for those of you wondering about jesus_phallus or whatever his name is: old boy wrote some pathetic comments about how we’re all ragheads and islam is evil or something or the other. i blocked him from posting, and also deleted his comments since his profile picture contained a picture of a male organ that wasnt appropriate for the site
    niqabii: go right ahead, by all means feel free to quote anything ive written.

  12. That Sen Tzu quote sent chills down my spine… how true that is.

  13. haha, good ole KR and his chauvinistic ways: “..the American Muslim chick that wants to make biryani but fails miserably at it because she hasn’t learnt anything easier from her mom… but I digress”

  14. Great post, you’re really good at coming up with metaphors.

  15. this was awesome…mA…and may Allah (S) ease your difficulties in your exam and help you do well

  16. excellent post, your xanga is one of the few i actually read. keep it up =)insh’allah you will do well on your exam.

  17. i must admit, i didn’t think i’d like ur post as much as i did… i didn’t think i’d get through it all.  but it was very nicely written and you hit on some good points.  in other words, i ended up loving it.  =)  the malcolm x line was good.  and i like the “pay it forward” bit.  may Allah (swt) grant us all the patience that we so desperately need and inshaAllah may you do well on your exam.  ameen.

  18. I would have to agree with everyone else and add that while I thought I’d just skim this particular post, I ended up reading it all and it was quite something. Most importantly, you have excellent writing skills and that comes across through the fludity [if there is such a word and I can’t be bothered to check] of the post.
    Onward to other things. Over all, I have to remark that I’m a little taken back by the analysis of what the Ummah as a whole must do. It’s probablly one of the most impressive theories I’ve read so far, and I will also admit, I don’t know too many that adress this issue. You’re probablly also aware that I’m going to criticique since you’ve left the comment section open and I hope that you take no offence. These are just observations and nothing personal.
    I would have to begin by saying, while I agree with you saying that one must learn how to walk before they run, there are a lot of strategic mistakes you’ve made in your analysis. Which ones? To begin with, anyone who reads this: ” my personal favorite, the Ramadan du’a cursing the Zionists and asking God to kill their children and make their women barren. ” All I can say is hate is taught, and this is a way of ‘normalizing’ it, weather you were joking or being sarcastic. Take for example a Jewish man walking around [and you had just been layed off because another Jewish guy was hired..] and this guy makes a remark about how Muslims should all be fired because they’re secretively all terrorists. I know you aren’t angry now but I don’t even wanna know how much you would be then. Now, you later learn he was joking, but that still HURT, OUCH! You just lost your job! What I’m trying to say is…. these kind of jokes normalize racism and discrimination. Anyways I could probablly say tons about this but I would I’m sure you get the jist.
    That leads me to the second problem I have with yoru analysis. You’ve simply stuck in an analysis of what it means to be prepared for war… and what it means to be prepared or not….  while I do see why you would’ve done that, at the same time I can’t help but be awed by how simplistic it is and thus, I don’t want to say useless because it is useful… but it isn’t adequate. I know you’re not going to write a 20 page paper about how to be prepared for a war… but this is way to simplified. You could’ve made reference to several dozen other sources which do elaborate on such an issue.
    [and if you’re not going to kill me for throwing me ciritique read on]
    I love the other thing you mention though… War is a game of lies and winning a war can largely rely on how well you can play with your opponents head [with lies]. I also love the ‘there would be no Mecca without Medina concept. That is just brilliant. Its hard to elaborate on things that are awesome, because they’re simply awesome.
    Finally, I agree with you ‘accepting’ of Israeli state because the reality is, we ain’t getting no where around getting those pre 1968 boundaries back. Yet at the same time, the whole …. well we just have to accept that and start moving forward with our economies part… thats way more complicated than you’ve made it seem. Its going to be next to impossible for the Palestinians to start getting back into the swing of life… with no water and electricity for weeks, around 60% unemployment…. and things of such nature…. it truly is a humanitarian disaster, like the Red Cross or the UNHRC has been reporting…. the first step towards returning to normalcy would be to resume water and electricity [of which I have not heard anything about as of yet…] and…. well… they have family members in prisons… and kids and older women at home… its way too complicated. So… interesting.
    Over all I believe that there just isn’t a leadership diplomatic enough, like Bismarc or something, in the Muslim world right now to lead all these nations towards unity and give them a sense of direction that they DESPERATELY NEED. Look at how miserable the League of Arab nations is doing?
    I’m sorry, I think my ciritque and feed back was way too long. Anyways, so long! Cheers, Jazak Allah.

  19. Aye, all the points given in this post are good points. But you should take it easy on the uncles arguing and discussing at dawats. Because as pathetic as they may seem for talking so much about that which they can do nothing about, people on xanga are doing the same thing. We’re just doing it in our own generation’s style (to us, dinner parties are for Halo and blogs are for discussion. To uncles, dinner parties are for discussion and the blogs are for braindead youth).By the way, I don’t know why you’re against protests and activism. If the protester is working on his or her soul as well then who are we to say their active efforts are bound to be fruitless? Perhaps the reason they are fruitless are because of politically inactive people like us. I don’t know, just wondering.And this? “..the American Muslim chick that wants to make biryani but fails miserably at it because she hasn’t learnt anything easier from her mom… but I digress” …is the bad guy phase coming back? Assalamualaykum warahmatullah.

  20. thewhale786: welcome, and thanks for the feedback. no offense taken at your well-thought out reply. it’s certainly better than most things i get around here…a couple of points to further the discussion:1. relating to the part about the du’a for their children to die, etc.: i was being sarcastic in an attempt to show how this sort of du’a is made in many Ramadan khatms all over the muslim world as a result of Muslims’ emotion and anger towards Israel, and how all that emotion isn’t really getting anywhere. i by no means support such a du’a to extend to all jews, but only to anyone–jewish, christian, even muslim–who aggresses against the ummah, killing without account civilians, women, and children. 2. the prepared for war bit was simply a point within this large, 3-part post that i’ve had. im not sure if you read the first two parts, but the point of this post(s) wasnt to simply talk about that issue, but rather to discuss my thoughts on a variety of levels as to possible courses for the ummah to take at this point in time. the bigger point about being prepared for war goes back to the first parts of this post, wherein i felt that we as Muslims have no business picking any fights at this point in time, since we’re woefully unprepared for combat. this doesn’t mean im saying that the lebanese people shouldn’t defend themselves and fight when people are invading their land and bombing their houses… no, they must fight to defend themselves from israel’s state-sponsored terrorist aggression against a sovereign nation. what i am saying is that overall, in the grand scheme of things, we need to stop picking fights (by kidnapping a few soldiers or doing something impotently pathetic) when we’re not prepared to fight, let alone win. 3. as far as moving on… maybe i wasnt clear, so its probably my fault, but i was referring to the rest of the muslim world, particularly the muslims living in arab nations. these countries need to use their wealth to develop mechanisms of power–technology, information/media, military, etc–such that they can exert influence in the region and solve the palestine issue for the palestinian people. im not advocating, or even expecting, that the disenfranchised masses of palestinians should just focus on their economy–since as you said, they’ve got nothing. im calling for everyone ELSE to stop being so pissed off at the jews and bush and everyone else, and start doing what we’ve got to do. if the arab nations were to just stop selling oil, they could bring the world to their knees without firing a single bullet. they fail to realize how much power they have if only they were to tap into it. and as you said, which i totally agree with, the problem is the lack of a bismarckian leader that people can rally behind. and for that, i offer that perhaps its not just one bismarck that’s needed at this point in history, but rather many bismarcks in all sectors of the world to get muslims to start accomplishing some of these intermediate goals that are necessary before we can even start discussing the idea of influencing world politics.again, i love the comments and no offense taken at all, whatsoever. i welcome your thoughts anytime.

  21. Hurry up and post Part 4

  22. chewing gum to solve a math problem. no wonderrr i almost failed advanced algebra in middle school. gRRrr.

  23. yahya’s IM comments:Collegeiskilli (1:19:03 AM): KRCollegeiskilli (1:19:03 AM): Loving this Collegeiskilli (1:19:07 AM): seriesCollegeiskilli (1:19:14 AM): your wasting your life away in med schoolCollegeiskilli (1:19:19 AM): become a public intellectCollegeiskilli (1:19:50 AM): you can change the image of Public Intellectuals being old stogy white men (ie. Noam Chomsky)Collegeiskilli (1:20:24 AM): to sexy men of color

  24. that was great kamkam…i should post on my xanga too…particularly since I’m living it up in pediatric neurology right now…tee hee…I’m going to a drug-rep dinner at Reza’s tomorrow…tee hee…

  25. it seems that the last time an arab leader in the region said something about isreal’s aggression in the middle east was in 73 when opec decided to boycott allies of isreal, and if im not mistaken, the united states had sent a relative of the king of saudi arabia at the time to assasinate him. It seems that if any arab leader tries to stand up against isreal, ie saddam, they end up killikng him, or toppling his government. Figures why King Abdullah, Mubarak, and whoevers in cahrge down saudi keep their mouth shut, and itll always remain that way until a muslim goeverntment is established somewhere in the world.

  26. Anonymous permalink

    nicccceee

  27. Briliant 3 part post kr, can’t wait for the next one. Good luck in your exams!Can I highlight your posts on my blog please?

  28. ^yes, of course you may highlight any of my posts =)

  29. In response to fudge166: With all due respect, I think you’re way off.You said: “you should take it easy on the uncles arguing and discussing at dawats. Because as pathetic as they may seem for talking so much about that which they can do nothing about, people on xanga are doing the same thing. We’re just doing it in our own generation’s style (to us, dinner parties are for Halo and blogs are for discussion. To uncles, dinner parties are for discussion and the blogs are for braindead youth).”If you search Kamran’s post, the word ‘uncle’ doesn’t even occur once. It seems that when he spoke about people ‘arguing at dinner parties’ you assumed he must have been referring to uncles. He was making a general comment, not putting down uncles. The fact that you equate ‘arguing at dinner parties’ with ‘uncles’ seems to show that you harbor the same stereotype that you are accusing Kamran of having. I think that’s really unfair especially as he never even said the word ‘uncles’ in his post. Also, you made a point about “us” doing the same thing as those ‘seemingly pathetic’ ‘uncles’ just in our own way (i.e. via blogs). That to me has absolutely nothing to do with Kamran’s post. His post was not about pointing the blame at uncles but rather highlighting the limited vision and understanding inherent in emotional and biased rhetoric (by anyone at any age) vs. the wisdom and necessity of approaching things with objectivity and sabr instead of frustration. I never got the impression from Kamran’s post that he was saying the ‘old people’ are discussing things irrationally and the ‘youngn’s’ are totally mature and discussing things with hikmah in their enlightned blogs. I’ve seen young people at dawats talking nonsense on par with the uncles. Although I haven’t seen uncles talk nonsense on blogs that is only because they haven’t caught on yet. With time, we shall be able to appreciate their conspiracy theories online as well as at the dinner table.
    So overall, even though you mentioned something very true, that people on xanga often engage in useless pathetic talk, I disagree with your accusations that Kamran is being rough on and singling out the uncles or that his post tried to show that young people possess tempered passions while the elder folk possess only passionate tempers.
    A Loyal Kamranite,-Mohd

  30. ummm…fishman/fishwoman? Like batman, spiderman and catwoman…but we could reverse it with detail…like kufi-fish, hijabi-fish, four-eyed-fish…yeah…
    About the post, just like everyone, I too loved the second to the last paragraph, from end to finish. From the Madinah/Makkah analogy to the Malcolm X quote, brilliant!
    Does pepper-spraying someone send them to the cemetary? Maybe atleast for the few minutes right after.
    About the contrevery-dua, which thewhale786 too mentioned in her/his third paragraph, I personally do not think that many Muslims make such a dua at all. Or atleast, I have not heard of any Muslims who might have ever even thought of such a thing, but that might be due to my limited social interaction. But just a little bit of my opinion here, any non-Muslim reading this might really think that majority of Muslims are the sort, and especially at ‘Ramadan khatams’, that is a HUGE thing.  I remember back in high school, knowing that only 3-4 Muslims existed in a school of 2500, I purposely would dress up in the month of Ramadan, like I would on Eid, so that the non-Muslims there would want to ask exactly what are you celebrating. And when they realize oh she along with some 1.5 billion Muslims go through this month to recognize the poor and to appreciate all they have,but at the end of the month want other religion’s chiildren dead, and women barren…umm..doesnt give out a good message. (Though I doubt all of the 2500 students and 70-80 teachers might have visited and read about this dua and thought what I mentioned. But after the long para with a bunch of run-ons, which I am way too lazy to edit, you get the point.)
    But…(not to start any fuss here because of the arrival of august here but,) I did read once in the Indian Reporter, yeah I read Indian newspapers big deal, about a few Hindu ob/gun doctors in India who started this ‘mission’ to kill of every child born to Muslim parents there, and then report it as some genetic disorder, or some birth related death or something. Along with this they had a few other things they would do in this mission, they even printed this ‘ten things to abide by’ kind of a list by them. (Again, not to start the August fuss…but yeah it went along the dua thingy.)
    Lastly, I do not like the fish can thingy…it will tracks every one, PUBLICALLY…hmm…and I wont even ask to be excused for the long comment…it has become a habit now…

  31. Mode you’re right. I should have thought more carefully. Overall I agree with everything he said. I don’t know who you are to accuse me of holding stereotypes though. I just see us dissing uncles so often I thought that may be what he was referring to.Anyway Mohd, I’m honored you even spent 383 words on a comment I made with almost no care at all, just to uphold your status as a loyal Kamranite. Shukran for the attention.

  32. I am indeed a Loyal Kamranite and if someone misinterprets or misrepresents him then I will make an effort to obliterate their obviously flawed logic. Whether the perpetrator writes a 40 page dissertation or in your case writes “with almost no care at all”, they will be corrected. Also to clarify, I didn’t write my words to “uphold my status as a loyal Kamranite,” rather I wrote them to uphold Kamran’s status as a fair, kind, and mindful person who doesn’t unfairly or haphazardly criticize people. He praises where praise is due and criticizes where criticism is due. To me, your comment was an afront to his character and a declaration of your view that Kamran was being excessively and unfairly harsh on one group of people. You have the right to hold that view, and I to refute it.
    Anyway, I revoke my previous accusations about what stereotypes you may hold. I hope you can forgive me.
    -Mohd

  33. ^let’s all have a big group hug… on the count of 3. 1… 2…. 3….*HUG*

  34. ahhh, that felt nice, i feel better already.thanks!

  35. finally got around to reading this latest post…good stuff…looking forward to part 4 =)

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